Evolving.
Published on September 7, 2005 By Angloesque In Politics
I am sick and tired of the fingerpointing following Hurricane Katrina. So allow me this brief moment to point out with my own ten hypocritical fingers some truths:

You can't have it both ways. You can't have a democratic nation but expect the government to dole out Band-Aids in the form of money and supplies. Refresher course: We the people make up cities that make up counties that make up states that make up the government. Each of those levels has its own accountability, so for you bandwagon liberals to blame the federal goverment is ridiculous, and for you bandwagon conservatives to blame the local mayor or governor is to turn a blind eye to everyone else.

What's more is that we seem to be so unbelievably unable to acknowledge two very known truths: That we as humans are fallible (at all levels), and that we as humans are responsible for ourselves. If every tier above you fails, you have to be able to count on your own resources and your own knowledge. If you know you live in a city 20 feet below sea level with levees that will only withstand a level three hurricane, then you're taking that risk by living there.

If you are a city mayor or a county commissioner and the government takes away your funding for levees, then it is your responsibility to find the money otherwise. If you are the governor and you know a category 4 or 5 storm is going to hit an area that is only prepared for a category 3 storm, then you need to ask for a mandatory evacuation. Afterward you need to request all the help you can lay your hands on, press conferences and showers be damned. If you are the president and you're on vacation, you need to turn your attention to more pressing matters. (Though I'm not sure Bush was on vacation—I thought he was visiting an Air Force base...hmm, must do more research....)

If you are human and you don't have the gift of foreknowledge, you need to do your best, and you need to realize that sometimes the perfect storm is beyond all planning and all imagination. Its aftermath is a time to help each other out, to make the world a little bit less horrible and a little bit more liveable. And you don't do that by sitting in your armchair and pointing fingers.

If you are an American citizen, you don't want Big Brother watching you to see when you need a Band-Aid and deciding when you get it, where to put it, and when to rip it off. You want to go down to your own corner store and get your own kind—maybe the kind that glow in the dark or that have cartoon figures on it. It's the power of choice and it's the American dream.

Comments
on Sep 07, 2005
I think there is nothing I can say that you haven't said already! Well put!
on Sep 07, 2005
Gasp! Are you really sitting there blaming the sweet and innocent people of New Orleans for their plight? Are you actually trying to say that all the worlds ills are not Bush's fault? Wow, how heartless of you! ;~D

I know I have written much on the subject, and yes, I do bring up one mayor and governor in particular. I'm not blaming either of them for the death and destruction in this disaster. However, I am taking them and their Emergency Management offices to task for incomplete emergency protocols, and not following the protocols they do have. If anyone wants to see the difference that a complete and comprehensive emergency plan can make, just compare the response timelines of New Orleans and Biloxi.

Also, New Orleans (both the people who live there and those who are in government) created a lifestyle where many of the citizens were solely reliant on the government for living and transportation needs. The local government knew that 100,000 people relied on public transportation, when the order to evacuate was given, the government officials knew that those people had absolutely no means of complying.

So, yes, self reliance is an integral part of individual freedom, but when government has actively taken on the responsibility to provide transportation for 100,000 people, yes, I expect them to follow through.

If you ask me, the whole evacuation problem was a great object lesson in the dangers of being too reliant on the government.
on Sep 07, 2005
Couldn't have said it any better. Gets you an insightful.
on Sep 07, 2005
We decry big brother, until the winds blow and the rivers flow too much.  Then we decry his absense.
on Sep 07, 2005
You can't have a democratic nation but expect the government to dole out Band-Aids in the form of money and supplies.


Well said. It seems that some people want to freedom to live their lives the way they see fit without interference from the government...but as soon as those lives fall to pieces they want the government to step in and fix things for them. It doesn't work like that.

Have an insightful cookie on me!
on Sep 07, 2005
I'm not blaming either of them for the death and destruction in this disaster. However, I am taking them and their Emergency Management offices to task for incomplete emergency protocols


And there is a time and a place for evaluating those protocols, and it certainly needs to be done.

Thanks to the rest of y'all. Thanks for keeping your brains on.

-A.
on Sep 08, 2005
If only George Bush had released those keys to the busses that the New Orleans authorities needed for their day late mandatory (but only if you feel okay about it) evacuation.

If only George Bush had violated the Constitution and taken over the state of Louisiana we would all be breathing a big sigh of relief.

on Sep 08, 2005
If you are human and you don't have the gift of foreknowledge, you need to do your best, and you need to realize that sometimes the perfect storm is beyond all planning and all imagination. Its aftermath is a time to help each other out, to make the world a little bit less horrible and a little bit more liveable. And you don't do that by sitting in your armchair and pointing fingers.

The most rational words I've read @ JU on this subject. In a perfect world, those words would not need writing, but since this ain't such a place, thanks for doing so.

Cheers,
Daiwa
on Sep 08, 2005
In a perfect world, those words would not need writing, but since this ain't such a place, thanks for doing so


Usually when I think I'm in a perfect world, there aren't any other humans around.

Nice to see you again—been awhile, hasn't it?

-A.
on Sep 08, 2005
Anglo -

Actually, just seems like awhile - was away on vacation for a week. Lot happens in a week.

Thanks for your welcoming words, nonetheless.

Cheers,
Daiwa
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